By:
26-01-2016

Discover How Garlic Cures High Cholesterol And Many Other Illnesses

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Garlic has many beneficial qualities including anti-cancer properties. According to Tibetan tradition, garlic is the main ingredient in ancient medicine for aiding weight loss and cleansing the body.
This superfood is able to speed up your metabolism and fight the damage that free radicals cause to the body. Here is some useful information about how garlic can cure high cholesterol and other illnesses. When you peel, slice, or crush garlic, it starts to spread a sharp smell. The sulfur compounds called glycosides are the main components that contribute to the characteristics of this strong smell.
In 1892, extensive studies confirmed that garlic contains unsaturated sulfur compounds as well as an anti-bacterial chemical called allicin. A few years later, a further compound was discovered, which had odourless needle-shaped crystals with the name of alliin. Although this compound has no anti-bacterial properties, scientists discovered that by adding the enzyme to fresh garlic, its anti-bacterial action becomes enhanced.
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Garlic prevents the generation of free radicals and supports the body’s immune system. It contains six potent and powerful phenyl-propanoids that have been isolated from its peel.
In a recent study, 50 patients with high LDL cholesterol levels and 50 with normal cholesterol levels were given garlic for a period of two months. The results showed decreased cholesterol levels as well as lower blood pressure. What’s more, there was an increase in vitamins C and E. This study confirmed that garlic has cardio-vascular benefits as it helps reduce blood pressure and cholesterol. People suffering from excessive excretion of hydro-chloric acid may find it hard to tolerate garlic.
However, this herb is highly beneficial for increasing appetite, strengthening the body’s nervous system, fighting infection, curing chronic bronchitis, and protecting the scalp against hair loss and dandruff.
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