By:
28-06-2016

Food For Thought - How Eating Chocolate Can Improve Your Smarts

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How is chocolate made?

Professional chocolatiers are never keen to give away their trade secrets but the industry is a thriving multi-billion one, with profits increasing right across the globe. We traditionally associate good chocolate with places like Belgium and France. However, cocoa trees grow predominantly in West Africa and Asia due to the perfect hot and humid conditions in which they can flourish. The humble cocoa pod is harvested biannually. The pods are then pulped and allowed to ferment for seven days in large wooden vats. Agricultural cocoa farmers then dry the beans out before roasting them and then shipping them off to the four corners of the earth. The beans then go through the process of grinding until they become a thick paste. The paste is then transferred to a conching machine where other ingredients may be added. The chocolate is then tempered and moulded by manufacturers.

Fun facts about chocolate

Our love affair with chocolate is as old as the hills and there are some fun facts that you might be interested to know. M&M's were originally created way back in the early 40's when world war broke out. They were specifically designed to have a shiny coating to stop them melting in soldier's hands.
Food for thought - how eating chocolate can improve your smarts
Milton Hershey (of Hershey bar fame) was in possession of a passenger ticket for the Titanic maiden voyage. Luckily for him, an important business meeting took precedent and he cancelled his travel arrangements at the last minute. Belgium came up with an innovative idea in 2013 when they launched a stamp collection that tasted like chocolate, and it's estimated that one hundred pounds of chocolate is consumed in America every single second. If you're impressed by that, make sure to read on because chocolate has some surprising health benefits too.
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