By:
23-05-2016

Ibuprofen Painkiller - A Healing Aid Or Harmful Hazard?

ADVERTISEMENT

What is Ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen is an anti-inflammatory drug that serves a few purposes. Firstly, it reduces swelling in an infected area. Secondly, it has an antiplatelet effect and this helps to keep dangerous blood clots from forming. Because of the twin aspects of the Ibuprofen formula, it is generally prescribed for common medical complaints that require a basic painkiller in conjunction with a swelling reduction feature. As inflammation directly causes pain, which in turn can cause fevers, this drug can counteract both very well. The World Health Organisation has included Ibuprofen as one of its essential drugs because it can effectively treat a number of symptoms simultaneously. Standard illnesses' like colds, flu, backache, toothache, arthritis, and other painful body symptoms caused by injury or disease, respond well to Ibuprofen treatment, although when taken as a blood clot deterrent one needs to take more and for longer durations to feel the benefits.

How does it work?

Ibuprofen was first discovered by researchers at the Boots Group, a renowned UK company of chemists. It operates by preventing the formation of prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are what our body releases into the system whenever an ilnness or injury occurs. It's this component that initiates pain and subsequent swelling which is most common, so treating it and preventing it can eradicate the symptoms quickly. This non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), analgesic effect can be felt fairly quickly and is a popular choice because it doesn't contain addictive components like codeine based tablets. It's a safe drug to take for most medical conditions and it doesn't cause drowsiness like other brand-named counterparts. However, perhaps we have become so used to buying it at pharmacy outlets that we don't always read the warning list that stresses Ibuprofen can sometimes cause an adverse reaction, such as the one reported by Hayley Lyons on Facebook recently.
CONTINUE ON THE NEXT PAGE...
ADVERTISEMENT

After you've read the article, how do you feel?:

The Open News © 2016.