By:
14-01-2016

If You Notice A Coin Lodged Within The Handle Of Your Car Door, BE CAREFUL!

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It is said that thievery is one of the oldest professions in the world. In truth, these criminals are quite clever and they are always looking for novel ways to fool people. Many analysts believe that the tricks and methods they use are as varied as the victims themselves. As soon as one way is thwarted, another one soon pops up. One of the latest (and most deceptively simple) traps involves the use of a few simple coins. Let's take a closer look at how a tiny sliver of metal may very well equate to a stolen car or worse.
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Using the Mechanics of a Car Door Against the Owner

The first method is very common. All that is required will be a small coin such as a penny or a dime (in the United States) or a five-cent euro (in the European Union). The theory is as simple as it is dangerous. A thief will approach the car when the driver is getting out of the vehicle. The handle of the passenger door is then lifted slightly. The coin is slipped between the handle and the door. Some analysts state that this action disables the central locking mechanism of the vehicle. In other words, the computer is fooled into thinking that the door is ajar. The driver will leave; completely unaware of what has just taken place. The thief will simply open the door, steal what is inside or even try to start the car itself and drive away.

More Than Vehicular Theft Alone

The second method is more insidious and dangerous. A thief will sandwich a coin between the driver's side door handle and the door. He or she then waits in the distance and out of public sight. When the driver returns to the vehicle and attempts to open the door, the coin falls to the floor. Most will hear this sound and naturally bend over to take a closer look. It is at this time of vulnerability that the thief will approach. CONTINUE ON THE NEXT PAGE …
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