By:
04-07-2016

Innovative Ironing - How Aluminium Foil Can Halve Your Workload

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Ironing Idiom

Ironing clothes for most is a tiresome task they'd rather avoid. Apart from the time-consuming aspect, it's a thankless chore that rarely goes appreciated. For large families, hours spent ironing can become a real nightmare, as we tend to only wear clothes once before we toss them in the washing machine. The end result is an ever-present mountain of garments that need their pleats, folds and creases sorted. Mounds of unironed clothes seem to grow of their own accord and this is why we probably procrastinate, hoping they'll do the job by themselves. The bigger the mountain, the greater our reluctance to get stuck in and clear the backlog. Hence, most of us only drag the iron out when we desperately need that one piece of clothing and we can't wear it until it's ironed. For many, dry cleaning options are just too expensive so how can we make the ironing job more enjoyable?

Ironing hacks

If you've a large family and particularly if you have children, you're bound to be faced with monotonous mountains of washing and ironing on a daily basis. Contrary to popular belief, it's not necessary to iron every single tiny item. When it comes to baby clothes, it's unusual for them to last more than a day without staining. Vests, jumpsuits, socks and other undergarments hardly benefit from ironing. The same can be said for towels, bed linen, tablecloths, underwear, tee-shirts, handkerchiefs and other small (or large) pieces, because these items if handled correctly can be made to look like they've already been ironed. The trick is how you treat them when they come out of the washing machine when they are still wet. Most creases can be shaken out there and then. It also helps to stretch garments while they are still wet. Then fold them where creases usually form. If you still feel certain items need ironing, we've a cool trick which will cut your workload time in half.
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