By:
27-12-2015

Seven Foods That Should Never Be Reheated.

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1 - Chicken

When chicken doesn't all get eaten, it's tempting to pop it in the fridge with plans to reheat and eat it again. It's probably one of the most frequently reheated meats but, due to its high protein content, there are inherent dangers in reheating chicken. Science has identified that all food's in a constant state of change, undergoing chemical transformations as it ages and matures. These reactions continue after the cooking process has taken place and, after just 24 hours, reheating can lead to digestive problems and a changed flavour, because the composition of the protein undergoes a dramatic alteration. Reheating chicken causes proteins that were clumped together to unravel as they're more susceptible to chemical changes. As the proteins break down, they release iron, which breaks up other nutrients that the food contains. Aside from digestive problems, reheating chicken will cause a tougher texture as the lipids (fats) react with the iron that's released, changing the constitution of the food.
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2 - Mushrooms

Mushrooms are popular when fried or as an ingredient in soup, stir fry, casserole etc. but should only be consumed as soon as they've been prepared and cooked, as the proteins behave a little like those in chicken, changing structure after a day or two. While chemical changes happen naturally in food, there are certain things we can do to interfere and change the processes through reheating foods. Mushrooms are a food that should never be reheated because of the chemical reactions that take place in the process and are detrimental to health. Eating mushrooms any time after they’ve been cooked for the first time could cause irritation or even more severe harm to your digestive system. It's important, therefore, to eat cooked mushrooms cold or to painstakingly remove them from the dish that's to be reheated. This isn’t something most people would relish, so it's best just to eat mushrooms fresh.
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