Articles - Ten Popular Legends and Myths about Your Body Which Are Completely Untrue - The Open News
 
By:
05-11-2015

Ten Popular Legends And Myths About Your Body Which Are Completely Untrue

ADVERTISEMENT

1. Urine Neutralises the Pain of a Jelly Fish Sting

Many people have heard that placing fresh urine on the site of a jellyfish sting is a failsafe emergency measure. Even the uptight Monica in an episode of 'Friends' once urged Joey to urinate on Chandler when he was stung by a jellyfish and in agony. Yet it is completely untrue. In fact, jellyfish stings are activated by cool water - which turns out to primarily consist of urine! So what is the best treatment for a jellyfish sting? The NHS recommends treating the affected person out of the water, removing any tentacles that still adhere to the skin with the help of tweezers - use gloves to avoid being stung. You could also use a credit card to swipe the area of any lingering nematocysts - poisonous sacs - still clinging to the skin. Take the affected person to an emergency room if there is swelling or they have any difficulty breathing. Otherwise, treat with ibuprofen to combat the pain and reduce swelling. Do not treat with urine and other popular remedies such as vinegar or baking soda should also be avoided as they can make the situation worse.
ADVERTISEMENT

2. Cracking Your Knuckles Will Give You Arthritis

It's a truly horrible sound that will make you wince, but does cracking knuckles actually cause arthritis? There are several ways of cracking knuckles; some people pull on the tip of each finger until they hear the popping sound of the joint. Others pull their fingers backwards all at once or scrunch them into a fist. People do it as a way of relieving nervous tension or simply because they like the feeling. Over a quarter of the population enjoy having a crack every now and then, according to research, while men are apparently more likely to do it than women.
There have been many studies attempting to find out whether cracking knuckle causes arthritic wear and tear. One professor even cracked his knuckles twice a day for more than sixty years but so far there is no evidence to suggest that it does cause any form of arthritis. The main effect of knuckle cracking is annoyance for any observers.
ADVERTISEMENT
Page 1 of 5Successiva >>

After you've read the article, how do you feel?:

The Open News © 2016.